There’s this thing called “The Decalogue for a Spirituality of Nonviolence,” written by two Franciscan peacemakers. Here are the last three points of the decalogue.  

“To be ready to suffer, perhaps even with joy, if we believe this will help liberate the Divine in others. This includes the acceptance of our place and moment in history with its trauma and ambiguities.”
 

“To be capable of celebration, of joy, when the presence of God has been accepted, and when it has not been, to help discover and recognize this fact.”
 

“To slow down, to be patient, planting the seeds of love and forgiveness in our own hearts and in the hearts of those around us. Slowly we will grow in love, compassion, and the capacity to forgive.”

To do whatever it takes to plant the seeds of love and forgiveness in our own hearts and in the hearts of those around us. This is the polar opposite of violence, even though it could have a violent outcome. Look at MLK. Or Jesus. Or the person who wrote this on the wall of a concentration camp. “I believe in the sun even when it’s not shining. I believe in love even when I feel it not. I believe in God even when He is silent.”

I believe there’s something more powerful than the darkness and violence of wanting to kill an enemy…or intimidate them…or break their kneecaps. “Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hatred cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.” ~MLK  

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.